Twains pessimism in huckleberry finn, by mark twain essay

The book tells a story about Huck Finn who grows up as the son of a drunken father.

Twains pessimism in huckleberry finn, by mark twain essay

In doings so Twain presents the reader with his personal view of mankind, whether he wants to or not: Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot will be shot.

Nonetheless, Huckleberry Finn, through examples of hypocrisy, greed, violence, and racism, shows Twain's pessimistic view of society and corruption of the human race as a whole. To understand the pessimism of the bookwe must first understand Huck. Huck is a character though whose eyes we see the ugly truth about mankind.

Huck is always on the run from people.

[BINGSNIPMIX-3

In the beginning we see him living a prim and proper life with the widow. He is then abducted by his father, and for a time is relieved to get out of the moral trappings of the town, and live sloppily, doing whatever he wanted to do. Huck is as dissatisfied by one extreme as he is by the next.

Huck chooses not to take sides on any matter, but instead be indifferent towards it.

Twains pessimism in huckleberry finn, by mark twain essay

Huck avoids moral decision making throughout the book as much as possible. In the end of the book Twain saves Huck's indifferent persona by bringing in Tom to make the decisions for him. Some may argue that in saving Jim, Huck saves face for the human race, giving a sense of hope for the future.

However, Huck must go about freeing Jim in an underhanded manner, lying and stealing his way down the river. Violence plays a large role in the unflattering portrayal of man. In the opening chapters we see young Huck joining Tom Sawyer's band of murderers and thieves.

When Huck fakes his own murder, he employs a fantastic knowledge of graphic violence. He kills a pig so he can leave a trail of blood, marking the path the murderer took to dispose of Huck's body.

It takes this seemingly horrendous act of violence to begin Huck's journey. In the Grangerford and Shepherdson scenes, violence is seen as a senseless act, committed by an inhuman instinct, rather than through intellect and will.

As soon as the Grangerfords hear that their daughter ran off with a Shepherdson, their first instinct was to get the guns and bag some Shepherdsons.

They did not stop to think that there might be an alternative solution.

Twain's Pessimism in Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain | Essay Example

The Grangerford and Shepherdson scene also shows the grandeur associated with violence.Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn Essay example - Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn The novel is set in the 's in St.

Petersburg, a fictitious place supposedly reminiscent of the town of Hannibal, Missouri the place where Mark Twain grew up.

It follows the events in . “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was written by Mark Twain (a.k.a. Samuel Langhorne Clemens, ) in and was originally meant to be read as adult fiction and as a sequel to “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” written in , although it is a text which can stand on its own.

Essay on Being Exposed to Racism in Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn In the book, Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, there are many opinions on the idea of racism throughout the book and if people, especially young readers, should be exposed to it.

Twain’s Pessimism in Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain simply wrote about a boy and the river. In doings so Twain presents the reader with his personal view of mankind, whether he wants to or not: Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot will be shot.

Nonetheless, Huckleberry Finn, through examples Of hypocrisy, greed, violence, and racism, wows Twain’s pessimistic view of society and corruption of the human race as a whole. To understand the pessimism of the book, we must first understand Houck. Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay examples Before any external forces unleash their influence, a person is born into this world with a clean slate untouched by the prevailing attitudes that shape modern society.

Twain's Pessimism in Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain | Essay Example